Menu
header photo

                  My Savage Ancestry                      

EMAIL:

rbsavage1@gmail.com

                  Hosted By R. Blair Savage & Tracy Savage Zuccaro

  
In honor of Russell Milton Savage 1901-1986

All material on this site, other than that which is cited from other sources, is protected through Copyright and is made available for private use only. Any commercial use or for-profit publication in any form is forbidden without written permission from R. Blair Savage at (rbsavage1@gmail.com) or Tracy Savage Zuccaro at _______-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------This site is a rebuild of the original savageancestry.com which began in 2005 and is a work in progress. At the age of 87 I think it's time to let one of my five daughters take charge. Having no sons to carry on my Savage line, the oldest continuing family name in America, my daughter, Tracy, is taking over. She tells me I can add to the effort if I behave myself.

Since the age of ten I have wondered where my family ancestors lived. I knew the names of my dad's father and grandfather, but that was it. Of my mother's Bucklew family I could go back only to her father. Since I retired in 1995, I've been able to spend time searching and I have built a family tree of roughly 1200 people. Seven of those were men who fought in the revolutionary war. This site is limited to my Savage line. At age ten I found the first hint of where my Savage family may have lived before coming to America. It was in a very large book among a small collection in a two-room school on the edge of Morgantown, West Virginia. The book was some kind of historic collection of names of prominent people. One of those was an Edward Savage. He was an artist in England in years passed. That was my first clue that England may have been where our guy originated.                                                                        R. Blair Savage on Easter Day, 4-17-22.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------                                      

                       Jamestown, Virginia, January, 1607

Thirteen years before the Mayflower landed, an ex-privateer who had lost a hand by a Spanish sword, commanded a fleet of three English ships crossing the Atlantic. Their destination; Virginia. Their aim; to create a settlement on a river above the mighty Chesapeake. Against all odds, that settlement called, Jamestown, survived and was the beginning of what would become the United States of America. The ex-privateer was Captain Christopher Newport and he had on board a boy by the name of Thomas Savage. Newport, accompanied by Captain John Smith, gave this boy, as a hostage, to the great Chief Powhatan in exchange for an Indian named Namontack. Newport's purpose was two-fold, to help ensure friendship with the powerful Powhatan and to have Savage learn his language. John Smith tells us Savage was thirteen years of age. Thomas Savage remained with Powhatan family for three years and learned the native language. In return, Savage taught Pocahontas and other family members to speak English. Savage was then an interpreter for the English Colony for the remainder of his life. When he became of age he was given the military rank of, Ensign. Had it not been for the influence Savage had with the natives, and the generous heart of Pocahontas, the Jamestown Colony would probably not have survived. In 1619 Ensign Savage settled in Accomack as the first white settler on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The Ensign is said to have given us the oldest continuing family name in America. Later in these pages we explore the life of another Thomas Savage, who appears in the Jamestown records as Thomas Savage the Carpenter. Many years of research has convinced me that Thomas the Carpenter was the son of Ensign Thomas Savage and a Native American girl.

Since the age of ten I have wondered where my family ancestors lived. I knew the names of my dad's father and grandfather, but that was it. Of my mother's Bucklew family I could go back only to her father. Since I retired in 1995 I've been able to spend a lot of time searching for my Savage heritage and I have built a family tree of 1200 people who preceded my mother and father. Seven of those were men who fought in the revolutionary war. However, most of my searching has been on my Savage line which took me back as far as 1632 when Thomas Savage the Carpenter first appeared in the Jamestown records. From there I was eager to find the identity of his father and from where in England he had come. As a result, I am convinced that I have solid information assuring me Thomas the Carpenter was the son of Ensign Thomas and a native American young lady. I will soon publish a book outlining the research that proves this to my satisfaction. Is this proof a hard document? No, but I'm certain such a document exists and we will find it one day soon. We have two leads as to where in the U.S. it may reside.

In all my years of research I've found no person, or source, on the Internet or anywhere else, which cites an actual record which identifies the parents of Ensign Thomas Savage and the location in England from where he came. If anyone has such hard evidence, we would sincerely appreciate your sharing it with those of us who have spent many years in search of it.